Circuses have a bad reputation for exploiting animals for financial gain. While at it, those in charge of these animals keep them in poor conditions, while milking every dollar they can off them.

In the UK, this has come to a stop with the passing of a new bill which bans circuses from using wild animals during their performances. The bill was announced by Environment Secretary Michael Gove on May 1.

Animals like lions, elephants, tigers, reindeers, and others have been used in circus shows for decades. Over time, they have been a source of several controversies, and this concern has finally been addressed with the passing of this bill.

According to the government, the use of circus animals no longer has a place in our modern society. This is the twenty-first century, and this landmark legislation will ensure that this practice is dead and buried.

But this is hardly the only issue the government has with regard to animal protection. The UK government wants to be in the front line when it comes to advocating the rights of animals. Previously, in a bid to protect elephants, a ban on ivory selling was implemented.

In February last year, the government swore to introduce a ban on the use of wild animals in circuses since the regulations at the time were nearing their expiration date.

And the government is not the only entity in support of this ban. It is estimated that over 90 percent of the people are in support of the ban, and animal rights groups have been pushing to have the bill made into a law for several years.

These groups have obviously been ecstatic to hear the news.

According to David Bowles, who is the Head of Public Affairs at the RSPCA, wild animals have unique and complex needs that cannot be adequately met in a circus environment. Therefore, the practice needed to come to a stop.

So, you can still go to the circus and have a good time, but you should not expect to get any wild animals there.

But that does not mean there will be no animals tolerated in circuses because animals that are typically domesticated in the UK can still perform. These animals include donkeys, dogs, and even horses.

Wild animals as per this legislation refer to animals not usually domesticated in Great Britain and would not be naturally found there.

However, in line with the growing concern over the welfare of animals that perform in these shows, domesticated animals will undergo regular inspections from officials to ensure that their needs are properly met.