It’s baffling how there are still plenty of parents refusing to get their children vaccinated against life-threatening diseases.

Claiming to be better-educated folks on the matter than the experienced doctors who fight tooth and nail to keep people alive and healthy, anti-vaxxers often subject their kids to their dark ages world view, with frustrating, and sometimes devastating consequences.

And the issue here’s that as a minor, you need the consent of a parent or guardian to get vaccinated.

But what do you do if you really want to protect yourself from deadly diseases, but your parents or guardian won’t let you?

Children of ant-vaxxers are now turning to the internet for advice on how to protect themselves from potentially deadly diseases against their parents’ wishes.

One desperate 15-year-old boy from Minnesota took to Reddit’s legal advice forum to ask about the legal consequences of faking his mother’s signature on a vaccination consent form.

The boy wrote:

“I am writing because I am the 15-year-old son of an anti-vaccine parent. I have spent the last 4 years trying to convince my mother that vaccines are safe. I haven’t succeeded.”

“So instead, I am trying to research how to be vaccinated without my mother’s consent.”

A school nurse, a “health insurance guy,” and several other Reddit users tried to offer some advice, but the teenager didn’t find a definitive answer.

Because, while there are states that allow minors above the age of 16 to consent to vaccinations, this particular Reddit user didn’t live in one of them.

According to Vaxopedia (a site created by Vincent Iannelli, M.D., a board-certified pediatrician and fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, to educate parents on vaccines),  minors wishing to get vaccinated without their parents’ consent have relatively few options.

Vaxopedia adds there are 15 states in the US where minors can give their own consent for vaccination.

These states include Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Washington and West Virginia.

For young Americans living outside these states, it’s a bit complicated.

What Vaxopedia recommends is that, try talking to your parents about why they don’t want you to get vaccinated.

The platform also adds that kids and teens can “[ask] someone, like your pediatrician, to be an advocate [for vaccination] and talk to your parents with you.”

And if all fails, children may have to wait until they’re 18 to legally consent vaccination without parental approval.